Alpha's Manifesto

A black and white figure's thought-hive

Failed experiments and what I’ve learned from them

Hey, I messed up but at least I learnt from it!

Failed experiment

In a preparation for a post that I’m going to write, I’ve prepared some code examples, and of course, making sure they work correctly. I spent nearly all of last week trying to find out what was wrong with my code, and when I did it, it was something really stupid. I don’t consider myself very stupid, so why did this happen? Let’s reflect a bit.

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Dealing with “unreasonable” clients

Customer management

Unreasonable stick figure

One of the forums from the StackExchange family which I usually visit is the Workplace one. It deals with office / team behavior, ethics and professionalism. The questions are incredibly interesting — most of the time, I’m not entirely sure what I should do in situations like that — and the answers are amazingly well crafted and thought.

And there is a particular one which caught my attention lately: Manager requesting task which I believe is unnecessary. And I found it interesting because we hear that a lot in the software world: “why is my customer / manager / leader asking for that if it’s not really necessary / a priority / important?”

Well, there are several aspects to consider. Let’s go in this world of absurd requirements together.

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How to perform a good code review

Reaching agreement from a bunch of code

Code review

I recently wrote about how to create a good pull request, this is, how to make your code changes easy to review and discuss. Now we’re going to talk about the second part: reviewing someone else’s code. This puts you on the reviewers side, and hopefully the person submitting code did follow our guidelines to make your life easier.

There are several approaches you can take to review the code, but we’re going to enumerate a checklist that you could use to minimize the usage of your time and the efficiency of the code review.

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How to create a good pull request

A meta-guide for creating easy to review requests

This has been a common question and a subject of debate since everyone has their opinions on what good code is and what bad code is. Regardless, the pull request is not about the code itself but about the actions of reviewing, adjusting, discussing and assimilating (merging) code, which may be good or bad in itself.

This will be later followed by a set of notes on how to perform a good code review.

Without further ado, let’s start with what is going to be a long article about sending a good pull request.

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How to find the problem

Applied skepticism

User minusSeven from the StackExchange community asked a seemingly uninteresting question that happens to be really deep and meaningful: How do you learn programming when you’re stuck and without access to the internet? All the answers there are really good and useful, but I think there’s an underlying theme worth discussing: how a methodical approach should be.

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Automatically logging your timesheets in JIRA

Having the tedious work done for you

Google Calendar To Jira

A while ago I explained how I use Google Calendar as my time-tracking system. I did mention, but did not explain, how I made this into an automatic system of timesheets for JIRA, the system some companies I work for use for time tracking. It just involves Google Docs and a little bit of JavaScript.

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ATPS: Angular, Protractor, Travis, SauceLabs

Quick guide to get these bad boys cooperating

Juggling with continuous integration

A few days ago I got the combination of Angular + Protractor + TravisCI + SauceLabs working together. There are a few quirks into making this work, but nowhere I found a comprehensive description to jump all the obstacles. Here I’ll describe what I did to get there.

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My time tracker: Google Calendar

Boxes and colors, what's left to ask?

Calendar chain

Long time ago I wrote about a proposal from a StackExchange user about how to use Google Calendar for task planning across projects and activities. The idea seemed good, and after months of making it my bread and butter, I think I have perfected it to address most of the problems I had with my workflow in Trello. It’s  not the holy grail of productivity, but it has helped me a lot.

Let me explain it to you, because if you use Google Apps or GMail, you’re most likely to benefit from this.

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